BAKARI KITWANA THE HIP HOP GENERATION PDF

The Hip Hop Generation is an eloquent testament for black youth culture at the turn of the century. The only in-depth study of the first generation to grow up in. Title, The hip hop generation: young Blacks and the crisis in African American culture / Bakari Kitwana. Author, Kitwana, Bakari. Extent, dpi TIFF G4 page. In this book Bakari Kitwana offers a sobering look at his generation’s By turns scathing, funny, and analytic, The hip hop generation will stand as the testament .

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The Hip Hop Generation

The only in-depth study of the first generation to grow up in post-segregation America, it combines culture and politics into a pivotal work in American studies. Bakari Kitwana, one of black America’s sharpest young critics, offers a sobering look at this generation’s dispro The Hip Hop Generation is an eloquent testament for black youth culture at the generatioj of the century. Bakari Kitwana, one of black America’s sharpest young critics, offers a sobering look at this generation’s thee social and political troubles, and celebrates the activism and politics that may herald the beginning of a new phase of African-American empowerment.

Paperbackpages. Published April 24th by Civitas Books first published April The Hip Hop Generation: To see what your friends thought oitwana this book, please sign gip. To ask other readers questions about The Hip-Hop Generationplease sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about The Hip-Hop Generation. Lists with This Book. Jun 11, Mehrsa rated it liked it. This book is an attempt to use hip hop and certain hip hop generation movies to illustrate the crisis in black culture today. It does not blame the media, but uses its descriptions to depict the culture.

There are a lot of good points in here and a lot of interesting connections between certain laws and government trends as well as other kitwanna forces that have affected the black community since civil rights. The hip hop generation is defined as those born after the civil rights era who are tr This book is an attempt to use hip hop and certain hip hop generation movies to illustrate the crisis in black culture bakair.

The hip hop generation is defined as iktwana born after the civil rights era who are tragically not living the dreams of equality of their baby boomer parents. The book is a bit outdated as I think a lot of the references no longer apply today it was written in and since hip hop and general thw changes so rapidly, I think a new analysis would be helpful.

Also, I think it is over-broad. It’s one thing to say that police brutality and sentencing laws have partly caused some of the cultural conditions for the hip hop bakagi, but quite another to bring in free trade agreements and the general kitwsna and just wars in geneeation. The author makes some good points, but dilutes them by bringing in too much. I also think that the focus and analysis of hip hop music and film was not enough.

I think he tries to make a political statement in this book, but I would have kitwaba a more thorough analysis of hip hop: However, he exonerates the rappers with their misogynist lyrics saying that yhe they don’t really mean it or that the women don’t mind, etc. I think there are people who would disagree and I wanted him to back up some of generatikn points. For a better understanding ,itwana black culture even the hip hop generationI would suggest Cornel West.

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May 23, Sarah rated it it was ok Shelves: What I really liked about this book was the author’s ability to suss out the differences between the values and perspective of the Civil Right’s Era generation and the new generation.

When Kitwana was talking about what he knew best: I wish he would have spent more time on this topic and less time on trying to solve the nation’s proble What I really liked about this book was the author’s ability to suss out the differences between the values and perspective of kitsana Civil Right’s Era generation and the new generation.

I wish he would have spent more time on this topic and less time on trying to solve oitwana nation’s problems. This book was going pretty well until the author made some painfully naive comments about economic development and globalization which betrayed the fact that he was speaking outside his comfort zone which happens to be mine.

I bakadi had to pull back my enthusiasm and take a more critical approach, which is when I realized that much of the book is anecdotal which works a lot better when you are talking about people and less well when bwkari are describing economies and not particularly academic speaking from the heart certainly counts for something, but it breaks the rule of armchair anthropology– you can’t describe an entire generation without any evidence to back it up– the data is there and he chose not to go look for it.

Stylistically, Zizek and Wurtzel are far more interesting when they try and tie philosophy to pop culture, though to be fair, our author doesn’t do a bad job, just not a bang-up job and these tie-ins are far more interesting than then ending, which I had to skim. The ending is what I have dubbed the Nintendo Manifesto.

Our author gives a little lip-service to the idea that Blacks are capable of free thinking and have a variety of political ideas, but goes on to outline the agenda of the hip hop generation; a manifesto that includes seven points, aimed entirely at serving the interests of Black youth, not the nation as a whole or even Black children or elderly or women and betrayed the naivete and arrogance of youth.

These were painful and I had to skim gop so as to keep my blood pressure in check. The hardest item on the agenda for the uninitiated to swallow was the demand for reparations.

Here I really thought Kitwana failed to explain why they were important, what they would accomplish, what implementing them would look like, and how this might affect race relations if they were accepted. Call me a privileged, white insert-expletive-here whatever, but reparations as part of the national agenda were hard to swallow in terms of likelihood of happening and I really thought Kitwana failed at his opportunity to convince me why they were something I should be passionate about.

The idea that Blacks would not vote for Democrats and you know the GOP is generztion going to consider it without reparations bordered on dangerous. Speaking as someone with a pretty some pretty radical ideals in my pocket, the my-way-or-the-highway political stance is just the kind of attitude the GOP likes to see, as it inevitably leads to disillusionment and disgust with the system and a righteousness about ths voting which is exactly what we don’t need more of in this country.

In some ways, Kitwana felt like the Dave Eggars of Black youth: Jan 13, Rodney rated it liked it. Bakari Kitwana has done a wonderful job pulling together some key facets on possible ways to shift the madness currently affecting our young blacks.

I’m not a fan of generalizations, but I understand that it’s the only means for people to sit gneeration and have a collective discussion. Honestly, I’m a part of this hip hop generation. We need ohp challenge our young people to think critically and not become a par Bakari Bakai has done a wonderful job pulling together some key facets on possible ways to shift the madness currently affecting our young blacks.

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We need to challenge our young people to think critically and not become kitwaha part of the “conveyor” system, but I’m sure the next question is “how when they see and feel there is no hope”.

Education is the key out of hope and despair. We are so fixated on having our children pass a test. They all need to be challenged to see beyond their current situations and come up with creative ways to surmount these issues regardless.

Even though this book was written a few years back, much as happened over the decade. Russell Simmons and many others have pulled together to add momentum to a movement spearheaded by “hip-hop generationers” and other generations.

The key is working together with our elders and young people for a common goal. Also, Kitwana mentions this in the book but it’s more than just a black movement. Even though the focus is on young African Americans, in order to really win, we must all come together. That’s the beauty of hip-hop. It will take many generations to die off and with the ever increasing reach of technology, people will realize that we are one. Overall, good book, but it just fell short for me.

The hip hop generation: young Blacks and the crisis in African American culture

Kitwana keep up the good work and I hope you continue to push our thinking. Aug 31, Stephen Yates added it. A good jumping off point, helpful also because of his coining of the idea bakark ‘the hip hop generation’ and his giving of the dates of to center the development of 1st generation hip hop culture.

Others have built on Kitwana’s thesis and spoken of the Hip Hop Generation 2. Dec ths, Jerome rated it really liked it Shelves: A clear-headed approach to addressing societal inequities through the medium of art. Not an ode of victimization but a fact based redress to the old tired rhetoric that blasts rap. Knowing the issues that rap and generafion hip hop culture addresses is vital to seeing it as a contrast to and critique of the so-called moral majority.

If you work with urban youth you need to read this book. May 07, Caroline rated it it was amazing Shelves: Wonderfully written text from a Black intellectual standpoint discussing relevant crises in Black culture today. I especially enjoyed the discussions regarding gender identity kiteana relations, as well as the issue of incarceration.

Paired with Chuck D’s idea of prison being the new plantation, revolutionary thinking is in the making. Jan 31, Jill rated ihp liked it. I really wanted to love this book. However, it seemed heavy on problems, and light on solutions. I also thought it lacked interesting anecdotes, which is usually what I love in some sociological writing. An okay enough read, just not my favorite.

Dec 25, Rushay Booysen rated it liked it. I enjoyed parts of the book but wasnt fully satisfied with the read.

Jul 20, Kates marked it as to-read. Dec 02, Tia Crane rated it really liked it. I’m not quite done with this one but I read bits and pieces in school and had to get it so I could finish.

It is a very detailed history and I love its social commentary! Aug 04, Caitlin rated it it was amazing.

Nov 02, Ashley Shear rated it it was ok. Kinda hard to get into. May 27, Joy rated it really liked it. Kitwana has a finger on the pulse of the movement. Sep 09, Mscharlee rated it liked it. Paints a picture ,itwana lots of things wrong within my generation. Alex Leonard rated it liked it May 18,